Sunday, July 17, 2011

File This Under Odd

And a bit creepy.

While perusing the News of the Weird while i had a bit of a headache, one story struck me as particularly strange.

The
Parkridge Medical Center in Chattanooga, Tennessee, made a mistake upon the death of a patient, Kenneth Mannis. No, they didn't commit malpractice, but they did somehow manage to send Mr. Mannis' mortal remains to the funeral home complete with his roommate's dentures. The Center had to pay to later exhume the body and retrieve the missing mandibles.

How, my headachy head wondered, do you do such a thing? Then, how do you explain to the family that you have to dig up their loved one, even if you are footing the bill? And if you are the owner of said dentures, do you really want them back at that point?


Today is

Birthday of Isis -- Ancient Egyptian Calendar

Constitution Day -- South Korea

Feast of St. Kenelm

Feast of the Carmelite Martyrs of Compiegne

Feast of the Clockless NowEver -- can't find any confirmation on what this one is, but it sounds like fun

Festival for Victoria and Virtus -- Ancient Roman Calendar

Galla Bayramy -- Turkmenistan (celebration of the wheat harvest)

Gion Matsuri -- Yakasa Shrine, Kyoto, Japan (one of the largest and best Gion festivals)

Independence Day -- Slovakia

King Letsie III's Birthday -- Lesotho

Luxembourg Beer Festival -- Diekirch, Luxembourg

National Ice Cream Day

Petal-Hopping for Hopeless Cases -- Fairy Calendar

Scillitan Martyrs' Day

St. Alexius Day

St. Marcellina's Day

World Day for International Justice

Wrong Way Corrigan Day

Yellow Pig Day -- mathematics festivals at various universities, celebrating the number 17


Birthdays Today

Tash Hamilton, 1982
Mark Burnett, 1960
J. Michael Straczynski, 1954
David Hasselhoff, 1952
Phoebe Snow, 1952
Camilla Parker Bowles, 1947
Diahann Carroll, 1935
Donald Sutherland, 1934
Phyllis Diller, 1917
Art Linkletter, 1912
James Cagney, 1899
Erle Stanley Gardner, 1889
John Jacob Astor, 1763
Isaac Watts, 1674


Today in History

Twelve inhabitants of Scillium in North Africa are executed for being Christians, the earliest record of Christianity in that part of the world, 180
Zhu Di, better known by his era name as the Yongle Emperor, assumes the throne over the Ming Dynasty of China, 1402
Catherine II (the Great) becomes tsar of Russia upon the murder of Peter III of Russia, 1762
Londoner Thomas Saint patented the first sewing machine, 1790
The first issue of Punch magazine was published, England, 1841
The Harvard School of Dental Medicine is established in Boston as the first dental school in the U.S, 1867
On the orders of the Bolshevik Party carried out by Cheka, Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and his immediate family and retainers are murdered at the Ipatiev House in Ekaterinburg, Russia, 1918
The RMS Carpathia, the ship that rescued the 705 survivors from the RMS Titanic, is sunk off Ireland by the German SM U-55; 5 lives are lost, 1918
An Armed Forces rebellion against the recently-elected leftist Popular Front government of Spain begins the Spanish Civil War, 1936
After being denied permission to make a transatlantic crossing, Douglas Corrigan takes off from Brooklyn to fly the "wrong way" to Ireland and becomes known as "Wrong Way" Corrigan, 1928
Disneyland televises its grand opening in Anaheim, California, 1955
An American Apollo and a Soviet Soyuz spacecraft dock with each other in orbit marking the first such link-up between spacecraft from the two nations, 1975
The opening of the Summer Olympics in Montreal is marred by 25 African teams boycotting the New Zealand team, 1976
The F.W. Woolworth Company closes after 117 years in business, 1997
A tsunami triggered by an undersea earthquake destroys 10 villages in Papua New Guinea killing an estimated 3,183, leaving 2,000 more unaccounted for and thousands more homeless, 1998
A diplomatic conference adopts the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, establishing a permanent international court to prosecute individuals for genocide, crime against humanity, war crimes, and the crime of aggression, 1998

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